Maintaining your mental wellbeing:

 5 Tips for Teachers working from home

Whilst the idea of working from home may initially have created a frisson of excitement, as time has moved on, the challenges of teaching from home have become more and more prevalent. 

These challenges, both logistical and mental, should not be underestimated. You are at threat of Cabin fever. The loss of routine, lack of direct contact with the students you have invested so much of yourself in, the creeping monotony of another day spent indoors, alongside the multitude of societal pressures; all this builds up to have a real impact. So here are 5 tips for you which may help you through the monotony and drudgery of this situation:

1. Keep work and play separate. This may well be the most important rule to follow. Try and stick to set working hours and make these clear to your students and parents so you aren’t responding to messages in your own personal time

2. If you can, get out and about more. Get yourself out in the sunshine (weather permitting!), blow away some cobwebs. Take a nice stroll (keeping yourself adequately far away from others). That vitamin D can do wonders for the mind (obviously if you are self-isolating you should stay home until you are allowed out again!)

3. Get exercising. We all know exercise is essential for both the body and the mind. Go for a jog in that sunshine, do some yoga in the garden or hop onto Joe Wick’s daily PE lessons – they are not just for the kids you know!

4. Reduce and be wary of social media use. There is far too much fake news floating around the social media platforms. That, along    with widespread panic from friends and family can all add up to an overload of misinformation and anxiety. Try to stick with official news channels for the most up to date information on the virus and current social restrictions and try and keep your social media positive.                                                 


 5. Stay in touch and spread some love. We are all having good and bad days. On one of your good days, you can guarantee that there is someone feeling quite the opposite. Check in with work colleagues, friends and family. Share your frustrations. You can guarantee that getting these things off your chest, or allowing someone to offload on to you, will ease those blues, even just a little.